TV4x3: Gold Rush Season 4 Episode 3 Watch Online Free
TV4x3: Gold Rush Season 4 Episode 3 Watch Online Free

HD4x3: Gold Rush Season 4 Episode 3 Watch Online Free Both men have spent the last few years deluded into thinking that the other is not a threat, but as they face each other in the garage at the end of Blood Money, they see each other's true faces for the first time. Hank and Walt are enemies, they are now at war, and we have seven more episodes to go. Don't forget to breathe.

What a pity it is for The White Queen to have hit its stride only this late in the game. The penultimate episode, with its shadowy plots, simmering guilt and double crosses, was HD4x3: Gold Rush Season 4 Episode 3 Watch Online Free smashing telly that our one remaining visit to the fifteenth century on a Sunday night doesn't seem enough. Who's for joining me in whipping up a frock from the dining room curtains and staging a saints' knees flash mob outside Media City until the BBC promises to return next year with The White Queen 2: Lancastrian Boogaloo?

HD4x3: Gold Rush Season 4 Episode 3 Watch Online Free nine's focus on a single plot - the fate of the Princes in the Tower - made for particularly satisfying viewing. Not only is it a fascinating and much-fictionalised story, but each of the main players had a stake in its outcome, leading to The White Queen's most cohesive instalment yet. Elizabeth wanted the boys out, Richard wanted them in, while Margaret and Anne, not without their guilt in the matter, wanted them slaughtered.

HD4x3: Gold Rush Season 4 Episode 3 Watch Online Free princes spent much of the episode like Schrodinger's paradoxical cat, both alive and dead until someone checked. Richard III (absolved of guilt by this telling of events) discovered them gone, and the last we saw Edward and his brother-impersonating commoner, a hooded figure had crept into their room at Buckingham's behest, and not, we suspect, to sing them a lullaby.

HD4x3: Gold Rush Season 4 Episode 3 Watch Online Free character who didn't appear to care either way about the boys' fates as long as the upshot left him closer to power and wealth was Rupert Graves' enjoyably self-serving Lord Stanley. The telly viewing public loves a bastard, and the number Stanley pulled on poor Margaret this week was bastardry of the highest order. Since his introduction mid-way through the series, Graves' modern performance has helped to tip The White Queen's scales from melodrama to drama, largely by delivering his lines free of stagey declamation.